Alternative Medicine? By Dr. David Hepburn

On a recent sojourn, my old clunker of a car seized up just outside Costco, likely after inhaling excessive toxic fumes of Polish sausage.  As it wheezed into recovery, our Hepburn herd marched into the big box store in search of mega stuff. With my wife off in search of 95 gallon jars of assorted condiments and my kids busy sampling the oyster ice cream, I moseyed on over to the Costco “books” area intent on finding Pseudohypoparathyroidsim For Dummies.  Instead, to my chagrin, I came across book after book with titles like Revitalize Your Lymph with Rutabaga by “Dr.” Pearl Diamond, and The Alternative Medicine Guide to a Really Really Really Healthy Gallbladder by Autumn Moonglow Johnson-Johnson.

Books seemed to glare at me from all directions, slap me across the face and demand that I Awaken Your Spleen Through Foot Massage, or cleanse my hidden immune system on Nature’s All Natural Naturopathic National Gnat Diet. Virtually nothing by a real doctor. By that I mean the guy who went thru 31 years of post secondary edukayshun studying sciense, disease and nurse behaviour. Flipping through Herbs Herbal Remedies I came across an excerpt of how Larry’s psoriasis cleared right up after an infusion of salamander saliva and ocelot tears, while on his vacation in the Dead Sea, during an El Nino. Subsequently, Herb now recommends salamanders for your ailing serum purple psoriasis cells. What does conventional mainstream medicine think of these alternative claims? I, for one, am somewhat appreciative of alternative medicine’s efforts to search for more effective ways to improve health. But, in this day and age when “evidence-based-medicine” is the battle cry, we need more than Larry’s anecdotes.

Imagen 1

I need to know there is some scientific credibility before I venture onto a 13 week diet of dragonfly knees and petunia nectar just to revitalize my inner magnetic force field. Let’s evaluate the evidence that a certain product really helps and a certain procedure really proceeds. You should be informed, and in some cases concerned, about some far out “alternatives” that may be harmful, useless and expensive, just as in conventional medicine. Does the “if it’s natural it’s safe” logic work? No ma’am.

Prancing naked through a mosquito infested poison oak swamp in Zanzibar, feeding on wild mushrooms feels quite “natural” but … King Cobra venom may help a pimple problem but unless there is an emergency, such as before the grad dance, I would avoid the snake oil. Drinking grapefruit juice can actually cause pregnancy if you’re on the birth control pill (sex also required). Personally, I don’t have a major problem with someone under my care adding extract of beaver hair as an adjunct to medical treatment, as long as it is proven safe and doesn’t really financially exploit the victim… er patient. My major concern, however, is the temptation of self diagnosis.

Before embarking on some Sabu flowerpecker therapy for what you think is diabetes, consult a doc. Playing doctor can be dangerous, I know, I often play one. Any studies done on this stuff? Yes, and based on a recent review in a leading journal I list below some of the more popular products along with a detailed scientific discussion as to whether they were felt to be effective based on current data:

Ginseng- nope                        Saw palmetto-yup

Milk thistle- mebbe               Ginkgo-mebbe
Echinacea-nope                     Bee pollen- nope
Feverfew-OK                           St John’s wort-OK
Kelp-nope                                Royal jelly-nope

Cannabis-absolutely              Spirulina-nope

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Discouraged after “leafing” through the medical advice from those whose entire medical training consists of a weekend flipping between ER and M*A*S*H (and watching the Golf Channel on Wednesdays), I took my pounding headache and made straight to the Black Forest Cake sample line. Our trip to Costco over, the kids stuffed on marinated albatross wings, we tumbled into the car, me whining about my headache. “It’s OK, dear” consoles my wife, packing away the two quart jugs of flea pheromones. “Take off your left shoe and I’ll rub your 4th toe, just above the knuckle.”

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